Refuge Farms, Inc., Horse Rescue & Sanctuary
EQUINE WELFARE NETWORK PROFILE



Refuge Farms, Inc., Horse Rescue & Sanctuary
3035 Highway 29
Spring Valley, WI 54767

Mailing Address:
3035 Highway 29, P O Box 195
Spring Valley, WI 54767


Phone: 715-505-5626

EIN: 20-2332234
Founded: 2001
Profile Last Updated May 08, 2020

Public Charity


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Deworming Paste
Refuge Farms is on a quarterly deworming schedule given by the number of horses on the pastures and supported by routine fecal tests.

During the season, at least one deworming is with a product utilizing ivermectin. Non-brand name ivermectin paste may be found a our local Fleet Farm or online at Fleet Farm.com.

Late in the year, we typically utilize a paste that contains fenbendazole. Again, this paste may be found at our local Fleet Farm or online at Fleet Farm.com.

In the calculation of tubes of paste needed, the entire Sanctuary Herd utilizes a total of thirty-two tubes of paste. An annual estimate of total tubes used, based on history, is forty-four tubes.

As an instance, our Beauty, who is the large sway backed Percheron mare from the PMU lines, weighs in at 3,000 pounds. Each tube of dewormer paste usually addresses a 1,200 pound horse. Thus, deworming Beauty utilizes three tubes of paste.

Thank you for considering this need for Refuge Farms.
Vaccinations Against Disease
Our veterinarian has notified Refuge Farms of a new vaccine now available by Zoetis which seems a logical move and safer for the horses being vaccinated.

The vaccination is called CORE EQ and is a one dose one ml vaccination for West Nile, Tetanus, Rabies, plus Eastern and Western Encephalitis.
For our rescue organization, this CORE EQ is the perfect solution!

Our horses rarely travel off the property and are rarely in contact with other horses so this grouping of vaccinations is what we would normally administer with two injections. Having all of our needs met with a single injection means less change of infection for our horses and less stress for the horse overall.

The histories of the majority of our horses are unknown to us. However, through our day-to-day handling, we learn their fears and thus, their stories. Many of our large horses and past show horses are fearful of a syringe. So to be able to cut their stress in half by only have to inject them with a single ml of materials would be a huge benefit to those horses!

And, as state above, even though we use extreme care in the administration of the vaccinations, there is always the risk of infection by contamination. To again cut that risk in half for each and every horse is a huge benefit and lessening of a necessary liability for The Herd.

Currently, the CORE EQ is available only through your local veterinarian. Refuge Farms is estimated to utilize a minimum total of three vials or thirty injections in the coming year.

Thank you for your consideration of this need.
Lawn Fencing
The non-pasture yard area at THE FARM is fenced with simple electric wire which is turned on when we have horses in the yard for an event or tour. When horses are not in the yard area, the electric fencer for that electric wire is turned off.

In the past winter, at least one horse was dropped off in the dark of an evening by the human walking the horse to the corral through the yard by entering through the non-hot electric wire fence. We have found several dogs tied to the t-posts of this very lawn fence and boxes with cats and kittens in them also in the lawn, just past the fencing wire.

It is becoming more regular that the public is leaving their animals of all types in our yard easily due to the absence of a fence barrier on the lawn perimeter of the property.

The local Fleet Farm carries a sixteen foot panel of three inch by four inch welded squares for the entire length at four feet high. If this panel were attached to the t-posts holding the wire and the top of the post was a single hot wire, we believe our abandonment episodes would be sincerely lowered.

In this new setup, the smooth electric wire would be hot all day, every day. The woven panel would not be electrocuted. The panel would need to be one foot above the ground to prohibit hooves from close to the panels.

The length of the yard space to be fenced in will require twenty of these panels which may be found at our local Fleet Farm or at Fleet Farm.com. Refuge Farms already possesses the needed posts, wire connectors, and electrical supplies for this project.

Thank you for considering this need for Refuge Farms.
Power Washer
A power washer is needed to address the dust and cobwebs accumulating in our rafters and peaks of the barns. The cobwebs allow flies to nest and the dust bring human allergies to the forefront. In addition, in the fall, webs appear in the building exterior soffets.

Our buildings all have overhead and/or sliding doors that are open every day of the year and the wind does a pretty good job of keeping the wooden interior walls clear as well as well as the metal wall facings above the wooden linings. However, the top of the trusses are twenty-six feet high and our hose with the best nozzle cannot reach the areas with any water at all.

Power washers have been shopped and our local Fleet Farm has a washer with an adjustable psi allowing the washer to be used for trailer cleanings, the peaks of the trusses, as well as the exterior of the barns and trailers. A volunteer who uses power washers in his business advises that the truss tops will require a 3200 psi force and the trailers, exteriors, and pond will wash nicely at 2000 to 2400 psi.

Power can be from a self contained engine or electrical supply however power is at a maximum of 110 in each barn. Power washers are available at our local Fleet Farm or at Fleet Farm.com.

NOTE: Throughout the barn cleaning it is important to know that bird nests will be left intact and power washing in those areas will be performed later in the year when the babies have flown from the nests.

Thank you for considering this need for Refuge Farms!

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES!


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Retail Store Supports Horses
Minimum Age: 18
During the summer months, Refuge Farms operates an upscale retail store at THE FARM. THE STORE, as it is called, sells an assortment of unique items from collectibles and antiques to kitchen items and wall hangings, vintage clothing, and beautiful new and vintage jewelry.

Refuge Farms is seeking volunteers interested in staffing THE STORE during its open hours of Saturday and Sunday from 10AM to 3PM. You will welcome guests, sell and pack merchandise to take home as well as sort and display items for sale.

Being versatile in math is helpful as well as an interest in meeting people from all over the world! Dress is casual.

Thank you for considering this need for volunteer support at Refuge Farms!

NOTE: Our WI virus restrictions currently prohibit volunteers to be present at Refuge Farms and THE STORE. Hence, new Volunteer Orientation and Training Classes are suspended until the state deems our business once again open to the public with precautions.

This does not stop us from gathering your applications and processing your application so once THE STORE is deemed open, we are ready to conduct our classes and get you in THE STORE greeting our customers and supporting our Missions!
A Life Changing Opportunity, Rescued Horses
Minimum Age: 17
A very special horse rescue is in need of compassionate and dedicated humans to support the healing and care of our rescued horses. No previous horse experience required, we will provide training.

Help groom the horses and do chores around the barn. A big heart is a great trait. And the rewards are unending and life changing.

If you are interested in volunteering, please go to our website - RefugeFarms.org - and complete the Volunteer Application. We will contact you to schedule a walk-thru of the premises and give you an opportunity to try us on for size.

Age 16 and younger require parent or guardian companionship at all times.

Thank you for considering the volunteer opportunity in our humble barns with these magical creatures here at Refuge Farms!

NOTE: Our WI restrictions currently prohibit volunteers to be present at Refuge Farms. Hence, new Volunteer Orientation and Training Classes are suspended until the state deems our business once again open to the public with precautions.

This does not stop us from gathering your applications and processing your application so once THE FARM is deemed open, we are ready to conduct our classes and get you in these barns to meet The Herd!
Equine Welfare Network Guardian
AWARDED ANNUALLY
Effective Date
May 31, 2020

We are proud to be an EQUUS Foundation Guardian and share our horse care & use practices with the public.

We welcome you to donate directly to us. We will receive 100% of your donation made here.

DONATE

Guardians
are organizations on the Equine Welfare Network that demonstrate a commitment to public transparency and accountability by their willingness to publish and share extensive data about their operations.
Awarded Annually
Effective Date: May 31, 2020
Last Updated: July 21, 2020

MISSION & PROGRAMS

Mission:
Refuge Farms rescues the dier horses or those that the other horse rescues refuse. These are the old, the diseased, the forgotten, and the crippled horses. We heal as much as the horse directs and rehome whenever possible.
     
     The horse that is terminally ill, heavily burdened with fears from severe abuse, severely crippled, or that requires significant cares are absorbed into the resident Sanctuary Herd. If a horse is rescued and rehoming is possible, those horses mingle with the Sanctuary Herd and will be rehomed when the appropriate forever home is located.
     
     Our Sanctuary Horses are utilized in our established Horses Helping, an Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) program of equine ground based mental health therapy. The program works with all humans in need of self-esteem, self-confidence, grief support, and general well-being.

Our organization provides programs involved with equine rescue, adoption & retirement
Our organization conducts Equine Assisted Services which are in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS).
Our organization provides community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses.
Our organization is directly responsible for the care and shelter of equines involved in our programs.
100% of our total programs and services are horse-related.
Number of facilities/locations where horses used in our programs are HOUSED AND CARED FOR or were HOUSED AND CARED FOR during 2020: 1
     1. Refuge Farms, Inc.
Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to foster, overflow and/or satellite facilities: Our organization uses foster, overflow and/or satellite facilities which adhere to all the policies, procedures and practices of our organization
Our organization has made equines available for research studies or medical training.

Please explain where and for what purpose equines are/were provided to use in research or medical training. 
     Refuge Farms brings horses requiring surgery, procedures, or significant diagnosis work to the University of Minnesota Equine Center or the Stillwater Equine Center which are both teaching hospitals. Most cases are assigned to an intern and veterinarian combination to give the interns real life hands-on learning. In all instances the permission of Refuge Farms is required and an intern's involvement is with only with a licensed surgeon and Refuge Farms present.
     
     Any surgeries may be partially performed by the intern however, the instructor surgeon is standing immediately next to the intern. This is done only with the knowledge and approval of Refuge Farms prior to surgery.
     
     In our experience, the interns are driven to be perfect so that many actually sleep on cots outside the Refuge Farms' horse's stall after surgery. And the learning of the student is greatly increased as a result of the involvement, thus creating an educated resource for saving more lives in the future.
     
     In addition, Refuge Farms is close to the University of Wisconsin, River Falls campus which has a four year major in Animal Science - Equine studies. The fourth year student will visit Refuge Farms in the spring to perform a comprehensive examination on each of our resident horses, including temperature, heart rate, lung and heart sounds, walking abilities, oral exam, eye exam, and rectal exam.
     
     In each case, the student is responsible for actually moving the horse from the tied eating space in the barn to and into the shoeing bed, which is a stock-like stall capable of housing a horse for select stand-up surgeries. This gives the students experience at handling all size horses, sighted and blind horses, calm and excitable horses, plus young and very old horses.
     
     In the final stage of the farm visit, after the students leave, the instructor meets with Refuge Farm and reviews the existing knowledge of the horses' health conditions in comparison to the student findings. Any incorrect variances are discussed and impact the student's grade.
     
     This relationship benefits all parties and it gives Refuge Farms a thorough overview of our horses' health and also gives the students real life experiences of handling client horses, identifying and diagnosing diseases and conditions, with recommending treatments to the owner.

Summary of organization's goals, strategies to achieve the goals, accomplishments, and capabilities to meet the goals, including its long-term plans to sustain its programs:
NOTE: As of March 2020, all programs, fund-raising events, horse adoptions, and volunteer activities have been temporarily suspended due to the virus restrictions. Refuge Farms is considered a non-essential business and thus not allowed to be open to the public until the state deems it safe to resume our activities.
     
     We continue to care for all of our horses and we have continued our rescue operations. However, adoptions are suspended. We look forward to being able to share our Sanctuary Herd again and are, at the same time, greatly concerned with the lack of missed financial support due to the suspension of our programs and fund-raising activities.
     
     The follow paragraphs is a listing of all activities and fund-raising events that would be current and active in a normal year. However, it seems 2020 is anything but normal. We do await the permission by the state to re-open to our volunteers and the public.
     
     Refuge Farms has a long-term relationship with three area public high schools. Each school has an at-risk program for teens demonstrating loud, criminal, disrespectful, and self-harming behaviors. These at-risk teens are the primary and intended recipients of our Horses Helping . . . program.
     
     Meetings are held with students and their parent or guardian to explain the program and review behavioral expectations, dress code, and available sponsorship to attend the program. Should a student express interest in the program and a parent or guardian not support the interest, the school counselor will attempt to work with the parent or guardian and provide an adult to accompany the student to the program.
     
     The high schools partner with Refuge Farms to celebrate graduation of the students from the program and also include the entire high school in a Horses Hands-On afternoon. This event introduces the school students to several Sanctuary Horses and allows touching and brushing of each horse - blind and sighted.
     
     The event is sponsored by local businesses in the school community and is held complete with donated root beer floats. Later in the school year, a Penny Challenge is held for each of the participating schools with all funds raised being donated to Refuge Farms in support of the Horses Helping . . . program.
     
     Sponsorship for attendance and program funds are awarded by the Hudson, WI Lyons club, the Elmwood, WI Rotary Club, the Menomonie, WI Optimists club, as well as each participating high school's PTA memberships. In this way attending the program in no way applies financial pressure to the home of the student.
     
     The relationship with each of the three existing high schools is strong and being used as a model to approach other rural St. Croix and Chippewa Valley high schools. We do have interest by several high schools in the Twin Cities area however crossing state lines has created financial school district issues that the schools seem unable to resolve.
     
     Horses used in the Horses Helping . . . program are our Sanctuary Herd of diers. The students thus work with blind horses, horses with broken legs, horses with trachs, horses with seizures, horses that are fighting cancer as well as, or in addition to, being severely beaten, neglected, and/or abused. These horses are excellent examples to the students and show the power of their wills and determination to live as well as their ability to forgive and trust again.
     
     As of January, 2020, seventeen of our forty-eight volunteers at Refuge Farms are graduates of the Horses Helping . . . program who have completed high school and returned to Refuge Farms to continue to be close to the horses and to help support the rescue efforts.
     
     The rescue portion of our missions and efforts is funded completely by horse sponsorships, vendor support with donation of product and funds, as well as fund-raising events. Refuge Farms also produces a hard copy newsletter twice per year of which generates a major response of financial support.
     
     Our adoption contract does not specify a price for the horse being adopted but does indicate that any donation by the adopting party will be used to help rescue other horses. Typically, the donation by the new owner more than covers the expenses incurred in getting the rescued horse healthy and ready for adoption.
     
     In addition to the above efforts, Refuge Farms operates an upscale resale store on the grounds of Refuge Farms. THE STORE is open from early spring to Thanksgiving weekend, weather dependent. We resell new items, antique items, vintage clothing and jewelry, as well as antique furniture, LP's, and collectibles of all kinds.
     
     All items sold are donated by supporters of our missions. All dollars raised from the resale of these donated items go to the direct expenses of feed, farrier, and medicines for the horses.
     
     Lastly, a canister program is in place and has been for over sixteen years at strategic retail and grocery locations. Canisters are emptied each month and collected monies counted, recorded, and deposited directly into The Annual Hay Fund.
     
     The physical canister includes before and after photos of members of The Sanctuary Herd, the Refuge Farms logo, address and face book page information, and contact information. Thus, the canister program has also served as a referral tool for owners needing to surrender their horses or for those interested in volunteering.

Horse Rescue, Rehabilitation, Retraining & Re-homing:
Overview of our programs involved with rescue, rehabilitation, retraining, re-homing and/or retirement:
     The retirement horse is the primary resident at Refuge Farms. Since these horses have been overlooked by other rescue organizations, the chances are great that the horses coming to Refuge Farms are blind, diseased, old, severely neglected and abused, and in need of support and retirement.
     
     Upon arrival at Refuge Farms, the horses receive The Promises giving them safety, love, a lack of abuse, feed including fresh hay and water with pelleted feed and supplements where necessary, medical treatment as needed to restore their spirit and health as much as possible, and a home for life - even in death the horses are buried on the property at Refuge Farms.
     
     Horses that arrive and may be re-homed do not receive The Promises but are treated the same in our barns as we wait to rebuild the horse and then search for a suitable forever home. Our focus on rebuilding is in ground manners and socialization. We do not retrain for riding, driving or competitions.
     
     Our adoption process includes completion of an application which gives us information and permission to run credit, criminal, and reference checks plus vet and farrier checks. We also do a facility drop-in visit prior to granting adoption.
     
     Upon adoption, the horse is given to the new owner with a new halter, a new lead rope, and a transitional bag of feed. Refuge Farms does not charge an adoption fee. Refuge Farms was founded based upon the goal of saving the horse's life and the belief that if the work we do is good work, the path will be opened for us.
     
     In our twenty years of existence, we have been successful in re-homing all the horses that were deemed candidates for re-homing. On December 31, 2019, Refuge Farms accepted a Percheron pair from a kill buyer. This manure wagon team was horse numbers 1,701 and 1,702 rescued by Refuge Farms.
     
     New adoptive owners are encouraged to attend our Horse Handling Classes to learn the techniques we have used with the horse while at Refuge Farms. This includes haltering, leading, gate and door passing, and trailering.
     
     Even though the virus has restricted public attendance and all classes and activities, Refuge Farms stays true to the Missions of Rescue we were founded upon. We continue to be present and ready to serve for county, state, and local incidents.
     Refuge Farms is also the primary contact for a total of five counties in Western Wisconsin for traffic accidents, investigations and horse seizures. Given the virus and lack of employment for many, our population varies almost weekly due to drop-off horses as well as other animals.
     
     Refuge Farms continues to accept these drop-off horses, evaluate them, treat them, and either accept them as Sanctuary Horses or prepare them for adoption once state restrictions due to virus control are lifted and we begin the adoption procedures again.
     
     While working with a county during a seizure, if viable horses are discovered, other rescues are contacted if the horses do not have significant issues that would deem them diers. Refuge Farms acts as a triage and contact supplier to find rescues that will take ownership of the horses with their intent to re-home the horses.
     
     Traffic accidents are rarely sources of even dier horses. Unfortunately, the freeway produces violent accidents when animal trailers are involved. If the animal survives the accident, the broken body is most likely beyond repairs and thus the horse is quickly and humanely euthanized on-site.
     
     Refuge Farms has been an active community member for the last 20 plus years. If a horse owner deems his/her horse to be in danger or the owner is unable to successfully retrieve or care for a horse, the owner may contact Refuge Farms for assistance. Assistance may involve an examination of wounds, extraction from being wrapped in smooth/barbed wire, retrieving a horse from a non-fenced area, or loading, trailering, or unloading a horse. If the issue requires multiple people on the ground, we work in gathering volunteers, creating a plan, and then directing the execution of the plan. In all instances, if abuse or neglect of the horse is suspected, the authorities are notified and Refuge Farms will offer follow-up visits to insure resolution of outstanding issues.

Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
Our organization provides the following equine assisted services (EAS):
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development
Not Checked:
    Therapeutic Mounted Services
    Therapeutic Driving Services
    Therapeutic Vaulting Services
    Therapeutic Unmounted Services
    Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)
    Equine-Assisted Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Speech-Language Pathology
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning


Overview of our programs involved with providing EAS to individuals with special needs:
     Our EAAT program will be delayed in 2020 until July, at the latest. After July, the school systems are absorbed in the next year's preparation and so attendance for at risk students will be cancelled for 2020. If release of activities is granted prior to July, 2020, we stand ready to conduct our classes.
     
     Horses Helping . . . was the primary program that resulted in the creation of Refuge Farms. The goal is to use The Sanctuary Herd in an equine ground based mental health therapy class intended to create self-esteem and self-confidence in the attendee through the teachings of horse handling skills. For twenty years, we have told the public, "We use the horses to help Human Beings heal."
     
     The typical attendee is a young adult labeled as an at-risk teen. By placing these young adults in situations with blind horses that, like them, have suffered neglect and abuse, an immediate bond is almost always formed at their initial introduction. The main goal of the program is authentic and positive reinforcement. Generally, these are teens that receive only negative feedback from their parents, teachers, police, etc. Horse handling is the technique used to give us the opportunity to give the students positive feedback and to help in building their self-esteem and self-worth.
     
     Our students have told us they are "shoulded" out. In other words, they tell us, the use of the word "should" is beyond disgusting to them. They tell us they tune out and shut down once the word is spoken at them. As a result, we go to great extents in our program volunteer training to find alternative ways of expressing ourselves without using the "should" word.
     
     We also train our horse handler volunteers to look for a skill developed that the students do well. The occurrence must be authentic and in real time. When spotted, the volunteer then comments to the student that "You did that well," or "You managed that very well." In doing so, the students will receive positive feedback and hopefully become more confident in themselves in the relationship with the horse and thus in life.
     
     Horse handler volunteers are trained in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) regulations since the school system looks for federal financing to support the costs of transportation and, in some cases, supplies, such as barn boots, for the students. HIPPA also gives us guidelines on the act of touching. These young adults are touched by humans but it is touch that physically hurts them. So touching is, to these students, frightening and creates uncertainty which is just the opposite of our goal.
     
     Class content and volunteer training was developed by a program director volunteer who attended and attained the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) certification, sponsored and funded by Refuge Farms. Our initial year of classes, 2012, was conducted by this program director with several other volunteers also coached in class intake, content, goals, and feedback tasks.
     
     The Horses Helping . . . program consists of five classes that concludes with the final class a role reversal: Each student selects an adult in his/her life that he/she finds difficult to work with, to communicate with, and/or to relate to. The adults are asked to attend the final class where the student greets his/her adult and introduces the adult to the group. Then we instruct the students to review the safety training of how to approach the horse, where to walk, and rules about turning cell phones off, language, touching, etc., with their adults.
     
     Upon completion of the safety review, we next instruct the students to take their adults into the pasture with their horse's halter and lead rope being carried by their adults. Then, we ask the students to teach the adults how to halter and lead their horses. The students are asked to have their adults bring the horses out of the pasture, through the barn, and into the class arena.
     
     Upon completion of this task, we ask the adults what was learned from their students. The students' self-confidence is visible, completely tangible, as their adults explain that they never knew how to approach a horse let alone how to halter and lead a blind horse. The adults express their pleasure at seeing the students as experts in handling a blind horse and their own learned abilities with blind horses.
     
     Throughout all classes, we make use of each opportunity, as it arises, to teach anger management, calming techniques, and general acts of respect. We find the students are, in general, very receptive if approached as an adult and, of course, the "should" word is not included in any conversations.
     
     If requested by Social Services or other community leaders, Refuge Farms will conduct a single afternoon version of the Horses Helping . . . program with a family, couple or single individual in dire need. Instances have included abuse, divorce, severe disease onset, traumatic brain injury accidents, and mourning the loss of a loved one. Time with the horses brings about opportunity for the person to focus on something other than the disease or event.
     
     Each individual class is unique and cannot be scripted. However, the goal is what we call the healing magic of our Sanctuary Herd. We believe and have witnessed the spiritual connection with a blind horse by a person suffering from a tragedy or trauma to give the person some relief or mental healing (for clarification, we do not claim to heal physical or emotional injuries or diseases).
     
     Often times, these sessions are attended by the community leader or therapist. In those cases, the class moves as that individual directs. It then becomes the job of Refuge Farms to supply the horses and equipment for the session and to allow the session to move as needed for the human healing to occur.
     
     Overall, the goal of Refuge Farms is to utilize the resident horses to continue teaching their lessons of tolerance, acceptance, forgiveness, and respect. In doing so, we are meeting the original goals of the founders of Refuge Farms, as stated in the Declaration of Purpose.

At a time when equestrian sports are under pressure to protect horses while making those sports more accessible, so too must all equine organizations ensure that horses are treated humanely when interacting with people with and without special needs. Our organization takes the following steps to ensure that horses are benefiting from their interactions with people:
     Each student/horse pair has a "spotter" or a horse handling volunteer assigned to the pair. In addition to coaching the student, the spotter also looks for any form of handling that would be unpleasant to the horse.
     
     In some instances, a physical disability prohibits or may even create a harsh lead rope, for example. In this instance, we work with the student and create either a modified lead or may even move the lead rope to the spotter for specific actions, thereby lessening the risk of a horse feeling a jerk or harsh pull of the halter.
     
     Most of our students are experiencing their very first touch of a horse and are shy or inverted in their initial interactions with the horses. As their experience is gained, so goes their self-confidence and likewise their ability to relate to the horse.
     
     We work very diligently to illustrate each technique in detail and then the spotter may select another one-on-one instruction of the technique of "Walk", for instance. At any time, if the spotter feels the student is not adhering to the instruction or is experiencing fear, anger, or a medical condition, the spotter will take over the handling of the horse and seek additional support of our floating volunteers, if the situation warrants.
     
     In the same vein, the volunteers are constantly supervised to insure the volunteers are handling the horses according to the guidelines detailed in their Horses Handling Classes as well as the volunteer handbook, The Ways of THE FARM.
     
     Should a volunteer be handling a horse incorrectly or creating a dangerous situation through their choices or actions, the Herd Boss Volunteer will step in, relieve the situation, and then address the misunderstanding with the volunteer. This may included one-on-one retraining of a specific task or command.
     
     In all activities, a Sanctuary Herd horse is utilized by a training class or a Horses Helping . . . class only once weekly. This allows the horse plenty of down time to relax and be an active member of the herd.


Community Outreach and/or Public Education:

Overview of our programs involved with providing community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses:
     All public tours and appearances are cancelled until WI deems our business category safe to re-open. Thus our community outreach is limited to online presence, newsletter circulation, as well as telephone contact. We stand ready to reactivate all activities the very day we are given the green light to make our horses accessible again.
     
     In addition to the Horses Helping . . . program, Refuge Farms has a variety of public appearances throughout the year with its main focus to educate the public in the use and enjoyment of all horses, and especially focused on the care and continued value of old, crippled, and blind horses.
     
     Refuge Farms is open to the public on published weekends and for private tours, including special family events. During these on-site public visits, select horses will be brought out of the pasture and into the barn, arena, or yard for grooming, kisses, and treats. We select horses that we think may fit a particular emotional need of the person visiting, when applicable. Of course, pictures are taken.
     
     During these public visits, we tell the stories of some of the horses and help to establish an appreciation for the forgiveness and tolerance these horses display. For example, we openly talk about Pregnant Mare Urine (PMU) horses and how birth control medication is produced when introducing Beauty, one of our PMU mares, a beautiful black mare with a severe and obvious sway back caused by the poor treatment during participation in that program. During these conversations, we have had women take medication out of their purses for confirmation that they are ingesting a PMU product. Lively discussion ensues when the women understand how a horse has been treated in order to bring that medication to the market.
     
     The children and young adults are particularly interested in our blind horses and how they can continue to have an enjoyable life as a horse roaming and grazing in a pasture and having normal human and herd relationships with other horses even though they cannot see. In many instances, we show pictures or give live demonstrations of riding one of our blind horses in a western saddle and a halter. No bit is used. This is a huge demonstration of trust to all humans present.
     
     Little girls will touch the healed eye socket of a blind horse and ask, "Then how does she see?" All visitors are in awe of how the blind horses behave like the sighted horses. The blind horses live with the sighted horses and have a large pasture where they graze and truly run free, without falling, injury or other mishap. They know where the barn and water tanks are and where to find their horse friends in the large pasture. It is often stated by the guests that it is "hard to believe we are watching a blind horse out there" in the pasture.
     
     Rarely is there an on-site visit where the Refuge Farm tour guide does not experience the "moment" when the visitor makes the connection with one of our Sanctuary horses. The visitor sees the forgiveness given by the horses now that they are in a loving and caring home, the respect the horses show, even though they did not receive such respect in their prior lives, and the newly learned trust and devotion the horses display for their human beings even though humans have previously been brutal to them.
     
     An example of this magic may be helpful to understand how profound these moments are to the visitors: A family arrived with prior appointment arranged by their clergy at Refuge Farms on a Sunday afternoon. The mother got out of the car and had clearly been crying. The teenage daughter was trying to play the role of holding the family together. The mother and daughter struggled to get the son and brother, now a high level quadriplegic, out of the car and in to his new wheelchair. The father said, "I don't know why the hospital sent it home to me. I just want to bring it back and go get my son."
     
     The clergy had shared that the family could not have a conversation or focus on anything but the car accident, the condition of their son, or the financial drain of the medical care and costs for caring for their son.
     
     As the family gathered in the barn, a blind Belgian named DukeDuke walked over and dropped his head to meet this young man. The family thought Refuge Farms had signaled to this blind horse to lower his head. We showed the family that DukeDuke was blind as he had no eyeballs.
     
     It was this magical meeting that started the family talking and asking questions about the horse's story and how to care for a blind horse, while grooming and connecting with DukeDuke. This was the first time since the accident that the family had connected and talked about something other than the son's condition, and in an animated and healthy way. Their healing had begun over DukeDuke and because of DukeDuke.
     
     A second event that stands out in our minds was the request by the Luther Hospital Suicide Ward for Refuge Farms to bring Faith, our Appaloosa mare, to the hospital for a suicidal young man who had just been admitted. Upon arrival at the hospital, the young man began asking for "faith" and the staff finally contacted his school and learned that "faith" was a horse at Refuge Farms. We were called and within two hours, we had trailered Faith to the hospital and this young man was standing with Faith in the yard of the hospital - sharing his heart with the mare.
     
     Some of our public events away from our farm include:
     
     1. Refuge Farms takes horses to Applebee's front yard for several fundraising events throughout the year, currently including two breakfast fundraisers (eighty percent of the ticket price goes to Refuge Farms) and four Dine-to-Donate events where Applebee's donates fifteen percent of the restaurant and bar bills to Refuge Farms. We bring horses and we get many questions and opportunities to educate the public about these amazing horses.
     
     2. We receive invitations to participate in community, school, health events or camp programs.
     
     3. Refuge Farms utilizes several of the blind Sanctuary horses for the Refuge Farms Blind Horse Parade Unit. We have a blind horse who pulls a cart and loves to move. Our parade unit is led by this mare, Helen, who pulls our wheelchair accessible wagon with her head high and proud. Helen and the wagon are followed by anywhere from four to seven blind horses, each ridden in western saddles with just halters (no bridles or bits) as a testament to their level of trust in Refuge Farms volunteers.
     
     As we walk the parade route, the parade goers see that the horses' eyes are missing and they ask how they lost their sight, how we train them to ride without eyes, and even why we do not use a bit. This is education at its best.
     
     Safety is important to us, so on each horse in the parade unit, a new white lead rope is hooked to the bottom of the halter and draped over the horse's withers. A trained spotter from Refuge Farms walks on the left front of each horse as a precaution. If a horse were ever to become frightened or out of control, then the spotter is there to take the lead rope and take additional control of the horse.
     
     In ten years since the first Refuge Farms Blind Horse Parade Unit appearance, we have never had an incident where a spotter needed to take a lead rope to control a horse. Of that statement, we are indeed proud.


EQUINE ASSISTED SERVICES CENSUS


Refuge Farms, Inc.

Equine Assisted Services (EAS)
         
2020 EAS Operations Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Horses/Equines participating in EAS programs at this facility        
Number of horses/equines aged 3-8 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines aged 9-14 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines aged 15-20 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines Over 20 0 0 0 0
Total number of horses/equines participating in EAS programs at this facility 0 0 0 0
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of hours per day each horse works 0 0  
Number of days per week each horse works 0 0  
         
Clients participating in EAS programs at this facility Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Total number of individual clients (not lessons) served annually
Average number of clients (not lessons) participating in activities per week
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of days per week programs are conducted at this facility 0 0  
Number of weeks per year programs are conducted at this facility 0 0  
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Average wait list time for a client 0  
         




EQUINE ASSISTED SERVICE PROVIDERS


Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
Our organization provides the following Equine Assisted Services (EAS):
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development
Not Checked:
    Therapeutic Mounted Services
    Therapeutic Driving Services
    Therapeutic Vaulting Services
    Therapeutic Unmounted Services
    Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy/Counseling (Mental Health)
    Equine-Assisted Occupational Therapy/Physical Therapy/Speech-Language Pathology
    Equine-Assisted Learning involving Academic Learning

3: Total number of Equine Assisted Service Providers at Refuge Farms, Inc.
     1. Bridget McConnell

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         Refuge Farms, Inc.

         RELATIONSHIP: Other

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Bridget has been providing mental health services to groups and individuals of all ages for the past 11 years. In that time, she has worked with individuals with a wide variety of mental health diagnoses and challenges. She also works full-time providing crisis assessments in hospital emergency departments, and is trained on suicide risk assessment. Bridget is a MN state licensed Human Services Specialist and a WI state licenses Human Services Counselor.


     2. Chris Oest

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         Refuge Farms, Inc.

         RELATIONSHIP: Volunteer

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Chris is the Refuge Farms primary contact with the multiple school systems in identifying at-risk teens for enrollment in "Horses Helping . . ". Chris is also the primary contact for the family during intake processing if there are questions, forms for completion and signature, or transportation issues. As a result of her long-standing participation in the Western Wisconsin school system, Chris is the primary contact for school administration for setup of transportation, credits earned and assigned, and any disciplinary issues. Chris is a WI state licensed Special Needs Instructor with an emphasis in communication and negotiation. Chris is currently working part-time in the Menomonie WI school district with 10th through 12th grade special needs classes.


     3. Lavonne Solemn

         FACILITY PARTICIPATION:

         Refuge Farms, Inc.

         RELATIONSHIP: Volunteer

         SERVICES PROVIDED:

         Equine-Assisted Learning involving Personal and/or Professional Development

         DEGREES, LICENSES AND/OR CERTIFICATIONS

         Refuge Farms first met Lavonne when her senior graduating students with disabilities visited us for an afternoon tour. After that visit, Refuge Farms engaged with the Menomonie Senior High School for two visits of each of Lavonne's classes each subsequent school year. The first visit would be in the fall and the students would be monitored as we asked them to react to "an unknown" - brush a blind horse. Their reactions to that stress would be noted. The second visit would be in the spring just prior to graduation. We would present the students with "an unknown" - lead a blind horse to a gate (approximately 20 feet). Again their reactions to that stress would be noted. Comparisons would be noted to measure growth in stress handling. During these class tours, Lavonne became attached to the horses and soon was volunteering with us. Lavonne has taken the lead in training our volunteers on recognizing disabilities and their respective characteristics, dealing with resistance, opposition, anger, and fear as shown by these young adults with disabilities. Critical path for "Horses Helping . . ." volunteering is not only learning how to safely handle the horses but also how to relate, coach, teach, and engage the student. The latter skills are taught and monitored by Lavonne Solem. Lavonne is also involved in the student intake process so we have a clear definition of disabilities and are prepared for typical reactions to fear, for instance. If needed, Lavonne will speak with the school liaison for a more complete understanding prior to the student coming to Refuge Farms. Lavonne is a WI state licensed Special Needs Instructor with emphasis in self-destruction and violent tendencies. Lavonne is currently retired from the WI school districts. Currently, Lavonne is working with special needs children in a classroom setting with 7 communities during the online education available due to virus restrictions.



GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & FINANCIAL REPORTING

Staff & Volunteers:
Chief Staff Officer (CSO):  Sandra L. Gilbert
Employees:   Full-Time:  0  Part-Time:  0  Volunteers:  48
Staff Recruitment, Screening and Training processes:
    Not applicable; We do not have paid staff

Volunteer Recruitment, Screening and Training processes:
    Prospective volunteers complete a written application
    Prospective volunteers must provide in writing if they have ever been convicted of a felony, convicted of a sexual offense, or convicted for animal cruelty or neglect
    Every volunteer is required to complete a Liability Release/Hold Harmless Agreement
    Every volunteer is required to provide Emergency Medical Information
    Every volunteer is required to undergo a Background Check
    Every volunteer provides parent/guardian information if applicable
    Every volunteer has a written job description
    Every volunteer is evaluated on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in their job description
    Every volunteer is updated on all the organization's policies and procedures on a annual and as needed basis or with any change in policy or procedure
    Every volunteer receives training that includes safety guidelines, confidentiality, horse handling, horse identification, and emergency procedures; additional training is job specific
    Every volunteer is assigned a supervisor (staff member and/or senior volunteer) and is responsible for keeping their supervisor up to date on work related activities
    The supervisor assesses the volunteer's abilities and assigns specific duties to the volunteer based on their skills
    The organization records and maintains written attendance information and hours on every volunteer
    The organization provides a Volunteer Handbook to every volunteer
    The Volunteer Handbook includes volunteer-related information, such as hours of work, dress code, cell phone usage, and the protocol for dismissal
    The Volunteer Handbook is reviewed annually and updated
    The organization holds regular orientation sessions for volunteers and prospective volunteers that includes an overview of the organization, its mission, activities, volunteer responsibilities and expectations, safety guidelines, and a tour of the facility
Not Checked:
    Every volunteer is required to sign a Photo Release
    Every volunteer carries current health insurance
    Every volunteer is subject to Random Drug Screening

Governing Body:
Board meetings per year:  3
Number of Board Members:  4  Number of Voting Board Members:  3

Board Compensation:
Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No
Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board/Staff Relationships:
Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes
If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member.
Mary Hetzel, Board Member and William Hetzel, Board Member, are husband and wife. They jointly owned and operated the St. Francis Horse Rescue near Stevens Point, WI. Throughout the years, Refuge Farms has come to know and respect the Hetzels and have found their values and belief systems to be very similar to those of Refuge Farms. They provide valuable feedback from someone else with experience in the trenches of rescue.

Board Affiliations:
Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes
If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization.
Sandra Gilbert, President and Executive Director of Refuge Farms, owns the facility where operations are conducted.
     
     On the first day of each calendar year, a lease is executed between Sandra L. Gilbert, a private party, and Refuge Farms, Inc., a 501c3 non-profit organization. This annual lease is for the use of all buildings, equipment, and land, for the total of one dollar plus 80 percent of all maintenance expenses.
     
     One of our long-standing policies and procedures is our Conflict of Interest policy. The policy is composed of elements from The Minnesota State Non-Profit Alliance example as well as key portions of other non-profit agencies with similar policies.
     
     At each Annual Board Meeting, the Board Members review the Conflict of Interest policy and re-affirms his or her agreement to it by signing it.
     
     The equine based mental health therapy program, Horses Helping . . . was formalized in 2012 and requires a Program Director. Although this position is a volunteer position, we require the Conflict of Interest Policy be signed by this Director in January of each calendar year to insure both full confidentiality and continued commitment to the program.

Conflict of Interest:
Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  Yes


Organization documents available on our website:
    Volunteer Handbook

Organization documents available on request:
    Most recent Financials
    Most recent IRS Form 990
    Most recent Annual Report
    Adoption/Foster Agreement
    Volunteer Handbook
    Bylaws

Additional explanation regarding governance, staffing and volunteer practices or further explanation of the answers above.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR MANAGEMENT SECTION -
     Refuge Farms is located near Stout University in Menomonie WI. A relationship has been established with the Operations and Management Department of Stout.
     
     Each year the Master Development Program for the Business School selects various organizations for projects to assist in the development of formal documents for organizations. In 2007, Refuge Farms submitted an application for the development of a Volunteer Handbook and Training Class series. As a result, Refuge Farms has a robust Volunteer Handbook that identifies the original organization forming documentation, goals, and the Mission Statement. Topics covered are horse handling, dress code, expectations relative to personnel (for us this means our volunteers) and guest interactions. The Policies and Procedures section addresses volunteer grievances, harassment, disputes, confidentiality, and disclaimers. The final pages are a glossary of terms.
     
     To complement the handbook, a series of classes was developed for full understanding of the Missions of Refuge Farms plus all aspects of volunteer horse handling skills beginning with The Foal Level of basic haltering, leading, and trailering. The next level is Mare or Gelding, depending upon the volunteer, with the final stage being Herd Leader. The highest level of skill, Herd Leader, can administer medications and injections, transport horses, and participate in investigations and rescues. Names were given to each level of training using horse terminology instead of more traditional terms, but generally equate with beginner, intermediate and advanced training.
     
     Each level of training has a list of exercises, readings, and videos to watch which expands upon the natural horsemanship style of horse handling we practice at Refuge Farms. A personal test is given. Achieving a passing grade on the test will earn the volunteer a patch and certificate of accomplishment declaring the new status.
     
     As a result of this partnership with Stout University Refuge Farms is well situated in the screening, training, and education of our volunteers.

Financial Reporting:
Budget:  *Missing
Equine Budget:   *Missing
Month Fiscal Year Ends: *Missing
Type of Financial Reporting (Audit, Review, Compilation): *Missing
Type of IRS Filing (990, 990-EZ, 990-N): *Missing
Does the uploaded Pro Forma 990/990 represent 2020? *Missing
IRS Form 990/Pro Forma 990 has not been uploaded for this facility.


EQUINE COSTS

Total Facilities: 1
Refuge Farms, Inc.: 2019 - Yes

Actual Horse Care Costs
$17490     Feed (Grain/Hay)
$0     Bedding
$4950     Veterinarian
$10620     Farrier
$7217     Dentist
$0     Other Therapies
$0     Manure Removal
$1440     Medications & Supplements
$4108     Horse Transportation
$3212     Maintenance
$1500     Horse/Barn Supplies
$0     Horse Care Staff
$0     Horse Training
$750     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.
$51287     2019 Total Horse Care Costs
Donated Horse Care Costs
$0     Feed (Grain/Hay)
$0     Bedding
$0     Veterinarian
$0     Farrier
$0     Dentist
$0     Other Therapies
$0     Manure Removal
$0     Medications & Supplements
$0     Horse Transportation
$0     Maintenance
$0     Horse/Barn Supplies
$0     Horse Care Staff
$0     Horse Training
$0     Other direct horse-related costs not including overhead or other program costs.
$0     2019 Total Donated Costs

/ Refuge Farms, Inc.: **Other Costs $750 - Burial Expense

Average direct cost per day per horse: $10
Average total cost per day per horse: $10
Average length of stay for an equine: 279 days (5293/19)


POLICIES

Acquisition
Our organization acquires horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Purchase/Adoption from Owner  
    Purchase from auction  
    Purchase from kill pen or feedlot  
    Return  
    Surrender  
    Seizure  
    Abandonment  

Our organization does not acquire horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Donation  
    Free Lease  

Our organization will accept the following:
    Geldings
    Mares
    Pregnant Mares
    Foals
    Only Stallions to be castrated

Not Checked:
    Stallions

Additional information about our acquisition policies and practices:
Refuge Farms utilizes a Surrender Document which is signed by the surrendering owner and Refuge Farms transferring ownership to Refuge Farms and giving Refuge Farms freedom to rehome or retain the horse in The Sanctuary Herd, as Refuge Farms sees fit.
     
     Also noted is that Refuge Farms will rehome the horse, if possible, without an adoption fee. The horse will be given to a new owner after careful evaluation of the person's abilities to support and care for the horse, the facility that will house the horse, and thorough vet, credit, criminal, and personal reference checks are completed. As a result, no donation receipt is given to the surrendering party.

Intake, Assessment & Training
Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization requires the following with respect to the health status of the horse:
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, our veterinarian will administer appropriate vaccinations
Not Checked:
    A current Coggins
    Vaccination records that have been administered within the last 12 months
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, the owner is responsible for having vaccinations administered.

Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization has the following policies in place:
    The owner completes an application/contract which constitutes the agreement between the owner and our organization
    Horses are not taken on trial
Not Checked:
    The owner of a potential horse is interviewed over the phone or in person prior to seeing the horse
    The horse is evaluated at its place of residence
    The owner is financially responsible for the shipping of the horse to and from the organization

Upon intake, the organization has the following quarantine policy in place:
    The horse is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine at the facility for a prescribed period of time
Not Checked:
    The horse is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine off-site for a prescribed period of time
    The horse is not quarantined

The typical length of quarantine is:   More than 30 days

Following arrival of the equine at the facility, the following is performed:
    Physical examination by a veterinarian
    Physical examination by trained barn staff
    Photographs are taken
    A Henneke Body Conditioning Score is assigned
    Physical examination by a farrier
    Physical examination by a dentist
    Coggins test
    Blood work other than Coggins
    Fecal test
    Vaccinations
    De-worming
    The horse is scanned to check for a microchip
Not Checked:
    The horse is microchipped if the scan indicates that there is no microchip

Following arrival at the facility, the horse is assessed for following skills and behaviors:
    Retrieval from a pasture/paddock
    Leading with a halter and lead rope
    Temperament, disposition and attitude, such as rated from very calm to very high spirited
    Loading onto and unloading off a trailer
    Tolerance to unusual objects and loud noises
    Known vices, i.e., cribbing, biting, kicking, weaving, stall walking, etc
    Grooming
    Tolerance to multiple handlers at the same time
Not Checked:
    Saddling
    Bridling
    Lunging
    Mounting and dismounting
    Riding at the walk
    Riding at the trot
    Riding at the canter
    Riding by a beginner and/or unbalanced rider
    Jumping
    Driving (Pulling a carriage)
    Bathing
    Clipping

Horses provided formal training (groundwork or riding):   As needed; no set schedule

Additional information about our intake, assessment & training policies and practices:
Refuge Farms maintains a Market License with the State of Wisconsin allowing us to transport a horse to Refuge Farms without Coggins but mandates that Coggins is performed within ten days of transport.
     
     In many instances, the owner's word or records are not available or if available, not trustworthy. As a result, Refuge Farms treats all intakes as non-vaccinated and begins the vaccination routine from scratch, as a precaution.
     
     In instances of seizure and in some surrenders, the time of transport is the first time Refuge Farms sees the horse. As a result, we may have no history, medical knowledge, condition or physical shape, or behavioral knowledge prior to transport.
     
     To be safe, all precautions are taken with the new horses and they are sequestered in the corral until Refuge Farms' intake processing is complete and we have some experience with the personality and abilities or disabilities of the horse.
     
     Testing and training for riding occurs only with horses that are known to have been riding horses and are fully blind. In those instances, we may determine the horse to be a candidate for the Refuge Farms Blind Horse Parade Unit and we will begin training for that program. This training, however, only occurs after the horse has resided at Refuge Farms for a lengthy period of time, at least one year, and only as time allows. Our top priority remains the rescue, rehab, integration into The Sanctuary Herd or rehoming of each individual horse.
     
     In addition to the items checked above, Refuge Farms' new horse processes include:
     
     1. Skin scrapings for diagnosis and treatment (where needed)
     
     2. Diet is determined and documented. And if necessary, administrations of medications to include bute, Adequan, feed supplements, etc. are added to the daily diet and care documentation.
     
     3. Any and all treatment appointments are made with follow-ups and treatment plans documented.
     
     4. A blood sample for a full CBC is drawn.
     
     5. Fecal samples are taken prior to the deworming program creation for this horse. Following initial deworming program, another fecal sample will be taken to insure the absence of parasites.
     
     6. Quarantine continues until all tests are returned and actions detailed as well as the personality of the horse indicates it is ready to be integrated.


Breeding
The organization has the following policies related to breeding and stallions:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, does NOT breed horses.
    Our organization prohibits the breeding of horses/equines when re-homed or this statement is not applicable as all horses/equines remain at our organization for their lifetimes and are not re-homed under any circumstances.
Not Checked:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, breeds horses
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, are permitted to house stallions

Euthanasia
The organization has the following policies related to euthanasia:
    Our organization will never have a horse euthanized for space
    Our organization will never have a healthy horse euthanized under any circumstances
    Our organization may have a horse euthanized after all reasonable treatment options have been explored
    Euthanasia is done on site when possible to decrease trauma from transport
    Disposal of the carcass is handled within 24 hours
Not Checked:
    Our organization may have a healthy horse euthanized if it is a threat to itself, other horses, or people
    Euthanasia is done at the veterinarian's facility

Horses will be euthanized upon the recommendation of:
    Veterinarian
Not Checked:
    Senior staff member without a veterinarian's recommendation
    The Board of Directors, or a member of the Board of Directors, without a veterinarian's recommendation
    Not applicable. The organization does not euthanize horses

The following are authorized to administer the procedure for your organization in accordance with state laws:
    Veterinarian
Not Checked:
    A certified euthanasia technician
    Senior staff with appropriate training
    Employee of animal control shelter or humane society with appropriate training
    Veterinary student under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian
    Not applicable. The organization does not euthanize horses

The organization utilizes the following methods of euthanasia:
    Intravenous administration of an overdose of barbiturates

Additional information about our euthanasia policies and practices:
Upon arrival, a new Sanctuary Herd member receives three promises, given to the horse in the trailer before its hooves hit the grounds of Refuge Farms. The third promise states: You are home. You are here forever. No more fighting for a place in a herd. No more new water to get used to. No more trying to find the way in a new barn with a new caretaker. Even in death we will keep you at Refuge Farms. You can relax now. You are home. Disposal, to us, means burial here on the Refuge Farms' property. Only in extremely lengthy and frigid winters is an animal not buried at Refuge Farms. When buried, we select a spot that most reflects the horse's preferences - in the yard around the house and barns or in the pastures. If buried in the yards, the space is marked as a Memory Bed and adorned with trees or flowers, in honor of the horse's personality. If buried in the pastures, a tree is planted in the yards to commemorate the horse, in reflection of the horse's personality and appearance. Our horses are sedated prior to euthanizing to the point of being non-responsive. Our goal is to not have the horse feel any flutter of the heart, compression of the heart, or inability to take air in. Following the loss of one of our horses, a black flag flies at Refuge Farms for thirty days and our message board, visible from the state highway, reports the loss of the special horse, personally and by name.

Rehoming
Our organization has the following re-homing (adoption/purchase) policies and procedures in place:
    All potential adopters/purchasers complete a contract which constitutes the agreement between our organization and the new owner
    Our organization will only re-home a horse to a location where another horse resides
    Potential adopters/purchasers must visit our organization and be observed with the horse on site
    Our organization conducts a site visit of the adopter/purchaser's facility before the transfer of the horse to the adopter/purchaser's facility
    Potential adopters/purchasers are encouraged to do a short-term, on-site foster with the horse
    Adopters/purchasers are NOT required to provide updates
Not Checked:
    Our organization does NOT re-home a horse to first time horse owners
    The distance of a potential adopter/purchaser's home from our facility is a consideration for when re-homing a horse
    Our organization does not re-home horses under any circumstances; our organization retains custody of our horses and ensures care of the horses for their lifetimes.

The uploaded Re-homing agreement includes the following re-homing (adoption/purchase) statements:
    Our agreement states that re-homed horses CANNOT be sold, auctioned, or given away under any circumstances
    Our agreement states that re-homed horses cannot be bred
    Our agreement states that if there is any breach of contract the horse must be returned to our organization
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers can return a horse to our organization free of charge
Not Checked:
    Our agreement states that re-homed horses CAN be sold or given away with prior written approval of our organization
    Our agreement states that our organization reserves the right to make unannounced visits
    Our agreement states that our organization reserves the right to make scheduled visits
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers can return a horse to our organization for a fee
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for one year
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for two years
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for three or more years
    None of the statements are included.

Our organization requires references from the following:
    Veterinarian
    Farrier
    Personal/Other
Not Checked:
    Not applicable or no references required.

Transfer of ownership occurs:   Immediately (at the time of adoption/purchase)

The average equine re-homing (adoption/purchase) fee received by your organization:
Not applicable; None received

Our organization has the following policies and procedures related to horses that need to be retired, are no longer useful, or are no longer manageable:
    Horses remain at our organization for their lifetimes
    Horses may be found suitable homes by our organization
    In the case a horse is unsound and/or unhealthy and cannot be treated to relieve suffering, the horse may be euthanized
Not Checked:
    Horses may be returned to their owners
    Horses may be sent to auction
    In the case a horse is unmanageable and demonstrates repeated dangerous behaviors, the horse may be euthanized
    If a suitable home cannot be located within 12 months, the horse may be euthanized


Additional information about our rehoming policies and practices:
Refuge Farms is unlike other rescues in that no adoption fee is charged for any of the horses rehomed by Refuge Farms.
     
     When Refuge Farms was founded, it was determined that our job and top priority was to save the lives of abused and neglected horses that other rescues had left behind. In doing so, our perception of setting an adoption fee was very close to selling the horse. And our founders would not sell the horses. As a result, when Refuge Farms rehomes a horse there is no adoption fee charged.
     
     There is, however, a thorough exam of a potential owner and only if Refuge Farms is comfortable with the owner and his or her history, does the physical home visit occur.
     
     If, at any time, the adopted horse is not kept in the conditions stipulated by Refuge Farms in the adoption agreement or if, at any time, the owner cannot keep or afford the horse, Refuge Farms reserves the right to return the horse to Refuge Farms. Prior to return of the adopted horse, Refuge Farms makes frequent visits with documented training, housing, or care needs being clearly explained and training provided, if needed.
     
     This approach has allowed us to rehome horses that otherwise would have remained at our sanctuary when the horse was capable of being a riding horse or pasture horse, depending upon the owner's needs and desires. In rehoming, we are able to save more lives since not every horse we rescue then receives The Three Promises and remains at Refuge Farms for the duration of its life.
View Re-homing Agreement

EQUINE CARE & SHELTER/FACILITY INFORMATION

Total facilities at which our organization cares for and shelters horses used in our programs: 1

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to foster, overflow and/or satellite facilities: Our organization uses foster, overflow and/or satellite facilities which adhere to all the policies, procedures and practices of our organization


Refuge Farms, Inc.
Refuge Farms, Inc.
3035 Highway 29 Spring Valley WI 54767
Contact: Sandra L. Gilbert
Contact's Phone: 715-505-5626
Contact's Email: RefugeFarms@hotmail.com

Does your organization own, lease or use a part of this facility? Lease

Please list all local, state and federal licenses held by the organization, including the expiration dates, or indicate that no licenses are required at the local, state or federal level. Please also list if this facility is accredited and recognized as compliant with the published standards of an accrediting organization, including the name of the organization and the date of the accreditation.
     TThe Executive Director of Refuge Farms is a Wisconsin State licensed Humane Officer. This license was attained in 2011 by successfully completing a one week class with subsequent testing as well as attending multiple Wisconsin State Certified rescue and emergency classes. Each year, trainings to remain current must be attended in order to renew the license. In addition, Refuge Farms maintains a WI State Market License which allows us to transport horses without current Coggins tests as long as Coggins tests are completed within ten days of transport. This license is especially helpful in seizures, abandonment, and in accident cases.

Provide the contact information for the individual or organization responsible for investigating abuse in the county where the facility is located, including mailing address, email address, and phone information.
     St. Croix County Sheriff Department Attn: Humane Officer 1101 Carmichael Road Hudson, WI 54016 715-381-4320 no email

Does your organization conduct Equine Assisted Services (EAS) at this facility in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS)? Yes

Total number of Equine Assisted Service Providers AT THIS FACILITY, including instructors, specialists, therapists, counselors, coaches and/or facilitators (full-time, part-time, volunteer, independent contractors, and/or providers accompanying clients) that conduct Equine Assisted Services (EAS) in accordance with the EQUUS Foundation Guidelines on Qualifications of Organizations Conducting Equine Assisted Services (EAS) AT THIS FACILITY:  3

Equine Assisted Service Providers Assigned to this Facility: (see Equine Assisted Service Provider Section below for details)

     1. Bridget McConnell
     2. Chris Oest
     3. Lavonne Solemn

Refuge Farms, Inc.:

Grounds
Total number of horses involved with your programs at this facility: 14
Of the total number of horses involved with your programs at this facility, the number of horses that are microchipped: 0
Total number of horses at this facility INCLUDING those not involved with your programs: 14
Maximum capacity of horses at this facility: 24
Total acreage dedicated specifically to the horses: 19.9
Our organization has use of the following at this facility:
Structures/Barns: 3  Run-in sheds: 0
Pastures: 3  Paddocks/Pens: 1
Uncovered Outdoor Rings: 0  Covered Outdoor Rings: 0  Indoor Rings: 0







Regarding structures at this facility where horses are stalled:
Do horses have assigned stalls in the structure(s)?    Yes    
Do all stalls/enclosures allow horses to lie down, stand up and turn around?    Yes    
Is there adequate ceiling & beam height (a minimum of 12 feet above the tip of the horse's ear) when standing in all stalls/enclosures?    Yes    
How often are the stalls/enclosures cleaned? Weekly
Are floors constructed and maintained for both good drainage and traction?    Yes    
Is there a ventilation and circulation system in place to control temperature and prevent buildup of toxic gases?    Yes    
Is wiring inaccessible to horses and maintained for safety?    Yes    
Are fire prevention/protection measures (fire alarms, extinguishers and sprinkler systems) maintained and in good working order?     Yes    
Is there adequate lighting to ensure safety in all areas of facility?     Yes    
Are emergency contacts, including veterinarian contact information, conspicuously posted in easily accessible locations?    Yes    
Are human and equine first aid kits easily accessible?     Yes    

How many hours per day, on average, are horses stalled? 0-3;
How many hours per day, on average, are horses turned out:
    Horses are out 24/7 except they are brought in to feed
    Horses are out 24/7 except they are brought in if there is inclement weather
    Horses are out 24/7 except when they are being trained
    Horses are out 24/7 except when they are used for the conduct of the organization's programs

The following describes the pastures at this facility:
    All pastures are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly
    Pastures are rotated
    Pastures have natural protection for horses (i.e., trees)
    Pastures have man-made protection for horses (i.e., shelters)
Not Checked:
    This facility does not have pastures where horses can graze on pasture grass
    This facility has a written plan in place for pasture management, which includes guidelines for seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, mowing, dragging, harrowing, manure removal, removal of debris, the control of poisonous plants, and a schedule for cleaning
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for pasture management
    Barbed wire is used for fencing

The following describes the turnout areas other than pastures at this facility:
    All turnout areas are fenced to prevent escape or injury
    Electric fencing is used; electric wires or tape fence are visibly marked
    Turnout areas have man-made protection for horses (i.e., shelters)
    Fencing checks, such as broken or missing planks, loose fence posts, exposed or loose nails, detached wires, etc., are done regularly
Not Checked:
    This facility does not have turnout areas
    This facility has a written plan in place for the maintenance of turnout areas, which includes a schedule for cleaning, manure removal, and dragging
    A dedicated staff person(s) is responsible for the maintenance of turnout areas
    Barbed wire is used for fencing

The following policies and procedures are in place at the facility to restrict public access and to keep horses safe:
    The property owner, staff member or caretaker lives on the premises and ensures that public access is restricted and is responsible for the security of the facility and horses
    Horses are checked overnight
    By Appointment Only signs are posted.
    Hold Harmless signs are posted
    Visitors are only permitted at specific times
    Visitors are only permitted in specific areas
    The property is fitted with motion lights
    The perimeter of the property is fully fenced
Not Checked:
    A security guard is present at night
    No Trespassing signs are posted
    Authorized Personnel Only signs are posted
    Entrance gates are locked at night
    The property is fitted with a security system monitored by police or a professional service
    The property is fitted with a security system that is monitored internally by staff (or the property owner)

Refuge Farms, Inc.

Veterinarian Information
*Vet Assessment Not Current.

Veterinarian: Dr. Tia Sampair
Clinic Name: BoVeq Veterinary Services
W6579 570th Avenue
Ellsworth   WI   54011
Phone: 715-307-3202

Equine Care
Horse Health Care/Barn Management Records: What system is used to collect and store health/horse care records?
    Notebook or equivalent (technology not utilized)
    Onsite computer with onsite backup storage system
    The organization utilizes its own system to maintain records
    Our organization would use free cloud-based barn management software if available

The following items are consistent with our feed management plan and practices:
    Horses are provided with individualized feeding plans, including supplements, according to age and any health issues
    Feed plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Supplement plans are determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Horses are fed in individual stalls
    Horses are fed in groups
    Staff and volunteers are trained in proper feed measurements and protocols and observed periodically to ensure they are feeding correctly
    The feed chart is centrally located and updated as needed
    The area(s) where hay, feed, grain, and supplements are stored are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals in rodent-proof and mold-proof containers and grain bins
    Feed, supplements and hay types are clearly labeled
    Water sources, i.e., buckets, troughs, automatic waterers, etc. are kept clean, free of debris and chemicals, and protected from weather and other animals
    Medications are kept in a locked, climate-controlled area
Not Checked:

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to the ongoing assessment of horses in its care:
    Horses are assigned a Henneke Body Condition score upon arrival at the facility
    The Henneke Body Condition score is updated annually
    Photographs are taken of each horse upon arrival at the facility and kept with the horse's health records
    Photographs are taken of each horse annually and kept with the horse's health records
    Horses at our facility may be treated by an equine chiropractor
    Horses at our facility may be treated by an equine acupuncturist
    Horses at our facility may be treated by an equine massage therapist
    Horses at our facility may be treated by an equine nutritionist
Not Checked:
    The Henneke Body Condition score is updated monthly
    The Henneke Body Condition score is updated with each visit by the veterinarian
    Photographs are taken of each horse monthly and kept with the horse's health records
    Photographs are taken of each horse with each visit by the veterinarian and kept with the horse's health records

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to the weight-carrying or workload capabilities of horses/equines in our care:
    Equines are not ridden; not applicable
Not Checked:
    Our organization evaluates the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine at least annually
    Our organization maintains a written record for each equine that documents the results of each evaluation of weight-carrying and workload limitations
    Our organization does not evaluate the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine

The following variables are considered in determining the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine:
    Equines are not ridden; not applicable
Not Checked:
    Equine age, weight, breed, body condition, fitness, balance, health and soundness
    Equine conformation to include the top line, length of back, strength and width of loin, bone density (measured by the circumference of the cannon bone just below the knee)
    Size, shape, condition and angle of the hooves
    Participant weight, height, body proportions, balance, fitness and riding skills as well as behavioral issues and safety concerns
    Weight and proper fit of the saddle and other equipment
    Terrain and footing in the working environment
    Duration and frequency of working sessions, as the frequency with which an equine is subjected to maximum weight carrying and/or workload
    Nature and pace of work, repetitive or varied, radius of turns, degree of incline and regularity of footing when equine is subject to maximum weight-carrying capacity
    Temperature and/or weather conditions
    Seasonal impact on the equines' workload and weight-carrying capabilities and limitations
    Our organization does not evaluate the weight-carrying and workload limitations for each equine

Do horses have access to clean drinking water at all times?     Yes    

Hoof Care: How often is hoof care provided for each horse? Every 3 months and when an issue arises

Dental Care: How often is dental care provided for each horse? Annually and when an issue arises

Physical Examinations: How often is each horse given a physical exam by a veterinarian? Annually and when an issue arises

Horse checks: How often are horses visually and physically checked by personnel at the facility? Every day or 6 days a week

Parasite Control: Our organization has the following worming protocols in place: (Check all that apply
    The protocol for each horse is determined in consultation with a veterinarian
    Fecal testing is performed prior to the use of a de-wormer.
    A de-wormer is used without fecal testing

Fly/Insect Control: What remedies are used to control flies and insects?
    Fly parasites
    Fly Traps and Tapes
    Fly Spray Repellent
    Fly Masks
    Fly Sheets
    Fans

The following represent the biosecurity practices in place at facility:
    Our organization follows the AAEP's Biosecurity Guidelines and/or the UC Davis Biosecurity Guidelines
    All volunteers are trained in best practices related to biosecurity
    A specific individual is assigned to care for sick, affected and/or quarantined horses
    Sick, affected and/or quarantined horses are cared for last if the caretaker must also care for healthy horses
    Sick, affected and/or quarantined horses do not have contact with other horses or other animals
    Hand sanitizers and footbaths are available at all primary points of access to sick, affected and/or quarantined horses
    Manure and bedding from sick, affected and/or quarantined horses is disposed of in specific areas designated for infectious materials - not put in open air piles, and not spread on pastures
    Horse trailers/vans used by sick, affected and/or quarantined horses are cleaned and disinfected after each use and cleaning takes place away from where horses are sheltered
    Horse-specific equipment used by sick, affected and/or quarantined horses is not shared and is clearly labeled
    Latex gloves are worn when working with sick, affected and/or quarantined horses
Not Checked:
    The organization has a written biosecurity plan
    All staff are trained in best practices related to biosecurity
    Restricted access signs are posted at primary points of access to sick, affected and/or quarantined horses
    Stalls, aisle ways, and common areas are disinfected after conclusion of the quarantine
    Shared equipment used by sick, affected and/or quarantined horses is cleaned of organic debris and disinfected after each use
    Personnel are required to leave the facility (or shower and change clothing) after working with quarantined horses
    Horses/equines are not quarantined.

The following represent the manure removal practices in place at facility:
    Manure is hauled, sold or given away
    Manure piles are composted or spread on pastures
    Our organization adheres to the manure management guidelines set by state and/or local authorities
Not Checked:
    Manure is stored in dumpster(s)
    Manure is piled in an area where horses are not located
    Manure piles are covered

The following steps are taken to help staff and volunteers readily identify each horse on the property::
    Horses are assigned the same stall/location each day
    Horses wear halters with nametags
    A notebook or binder with photos and information on each horse is easily accessible
    A map/diagram is posted showing the location of each horse with horse names and photos
    Team leaders work with new staff/volunteers until they are able to identify the horses
Not Checked:
    Name plates are located on the stall
    Photos are located on the stall
    Horse photos and profiles are available on the website
    Staff and volunteers are provided with an information packet with horse profiles, including photos and detailed descriptions
    Staff/volunteers are provided training on confirmation, markings, colors, and breeds

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to tack, apparel and equipment:
     All horses have specifically assigned tack, apparel and equipment that is not shared
    Saddles are shared
    Blankets are shared
    Blankets, sheets and turn out apparel are fitted and utilized for each horse appropriate to the horse's needs and the weather conditions
    Blankets, sheets and turn out apparel are cleaned regularly as needed
    Tack is inspected for overall working condition before each use by trained personnel
    Tack is stored in a climate-controlled location
    Helmets are shared
    Helmets are cleaned/disinfected after each use
    Helmets are replaced after a fall
Not Checked:
    Saddle pads are shared
    Bridles are shared
    Bits are shared
    Sheets are shared
    Turnout apparel is shared
     Halters are shared
    Tack is cleaned after each use
    Tack is cleaned weekly
    Tack is cleaned only when needed
    Tack is assessed for fit before each use by trained personnel
    Tack is assessed for fit by trained personnel when a horse's body condition changes
    Tack is assessed for fit by trained personnel when a horse's disposition changes
    This facility enlists the services of a professional saddle fitter at least once a year
    Assigned tack is clearly labeled
    Helmets are replaced at least every five years.
    Equines are not ridden; not applicable.


Emergency Preparedness
The following plans, policies, and procedures are in place at the facility to handle emergencies and address weather related issues, fire safety procedures, and/or any additional hazardous scenarios the facility could potentially experience:
    Emergency phone numbers are posted prominently
    The facility maintains at least two weeks of hay, feed, shavings and medications
    The facility collects and maintains medical information from staff, volunteers, and clients
    The facility maintains appropriate liability and/or workers' compensation insurance
    All staff/volunteers are briefed regularly on emergency preparedness/safety procedures
    The organization has a written emergency preparedness/safety plan (EPP)
Not Checked:
    Emergency procedures are posted prominently
    The facility owns or has access to a generator

The written EPP addresses the following areas:
    Local fire department and/or the state's emergency planning department procedures
    Medical emergencies for clients, staff, and volunteers
    Medical emergencies for horses
    Evacuation plans
    Fire
    Natural Disasters - thunderstorm, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornados, etc
    Protocols to notify emergency personnel
    Building/facility exit plans
Not Checked:
    Power outages
    Terrorist attacks

The facility follows the specific procedures to help PREVENT emergency situations:
    Smoking is strictly prohibited
    NO SMOKING signs are posted prominently
    Hay is stored away from permanent or temporary structures where horses are stalled
    Permanent or temporary structures where horses are stalled are kept free of dust, cobwebs, trash, cleaning rags, and other flammable items
    Aisles and doorways are kept clear
Not Checked:
    Heaters with automatic shutoff settings are used

How often are the following checked or performed?
Fire Extinguishers are checked: Quarterly
Smoke detectors are checked: Not at all/NA
Electrical Systems are checked: Quarterly
Fence lines are checked: Monthly
Turnout Areas are checked: Weekly
Sprinkler systems are checked: Not at all/NA
Fire drills are conducted: Quarterly
Review of safety protocols with staff are conducted: Not at all/NA
Review of safety protocols with volunteers are conducted: Annually
The Emergency Preparedness Plan is reviewed and updated: Annually

Equine Transportation
2-horse trailer with truck or van:
    1 Owned onsite  2 Access onsite but not owned  0 Access offsite;
3-horse trailer with truck or van:
    0 Owned onsite  0 Access onsite but not owned  0 Access offsite;
4-horse trailer with truck or van:
    1 Owned onsite  3 Access onsite but not owned  0 Access offsite;
6-horse trailer with truck or van:
    0 Owned onsite  0 Access onsite but not owned  0 Access offsite;
8-horse trailer with truck or van:
    0 Owned onsite  0 Access onsite but not owned  0 Access offsite;
10-horse trailer with truck or van:
    0 Owned onsite  0 Access onsite but not owned  0 Access offsite;


Equine Assisted Services (EAS)
         
2020 EAS Operations Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Horses/Equines participating in EAS programs at this facility        
Number of horses/equines aged 3-8 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines aged 9-14 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines aged 15-20 0 0 0 0
Number of horses/equines Over 20 0 0 0 0
Total number of horses/equines participating in EAS programs at this facility 0 0 0 0
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of hours per day each horse works 0 0  
Number of days per week each horse works 0 0  
         
Clients participating in EAS programs at this facility Mounted Only Unmounted Only Both Mounted & Unmounted Total
Total number of individual clients (not lessons) served annually
Average number of clients (not lessons) participating in activities per week
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Number of days per week programs are conducted at this facility 0 0  
Number of weeks per year programs are conducted at this facility 0 0  
         
  Mounted Unmounted    
Average wait list time for a client 0  
         



EQUINE CENSUS SUMMARY

Total Facilities: 1
Refuge Farms, Inc.: 2019 - Yes

14 Total number of horses involved with your programs on January 1, 2019
PLUS: Horse Intake during 2019
0 Donated
0 Free Lease
0 Purchase/Adoption from Owner
0 Purchased from Auction
0 Purchased from Kill Pen/Feedlot
2 Surrendered
0 Seized
3 Abandoned
0 Returned
0 Transfer
0 Born at facility
5 Total intakes
LESS: Horse Departure during 2019
1 Horses adopted/sold:
0 Horses transferred/returned
0 Horses deceased
1 Horses euthanized
2 Total departures
17 Number of horses involved with your programs on December 31, 2019
13 Total number of active horses (not retired) including
horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.
4 Total number of horses permanently retired.

Summary: 14 on 1/1/2019+ 5 Intakes - 2 Departures = 17 on 12/31/2019

Total days that equines were in the care of Refuge Farms, Inc., Horse Rescue & Sanctuary during 2019: 5293


2019 Refuge Farms, Inc. Equine Census
14 Total number of horses involved with your programs on January 1, 2019
PLUS: Horse Intake during 2019
0 Donated
0 Free Lease
0 Purchase/Adoption from Owner
0 Purchased from Auction
0 Purchased from Kill Pen/Feedlot
2 Surrendered
0 Seized
3 Abandoned
0 Returned
0 Transfer
0 Born at facility
5 Total intakes
LESS: Horse Departure during 2019
1 Horses adopted/sold:
0 Horses transferred/returned
0 Horses deceased
1 Horses euthanized
2 Total departures
17 Number of horses involved with your programs on December 31, 2019
13 Total number of active horses (not retired) including
horses undergoing rehabilitation and/or retraining.
4 Total number of horses permanently retired.

Summary: 14 on 1/1/2019+ 5 Intakes - 2 Departures = 17 on 12/31/2019



5 Horse Intake Detail during 2019 0
0 Donated 0
0 Free Leased 0
0 Purchased from Owner 0
0 Purchased from Auction 0
0 Purchased from Kill Pen/Feedlot 0
2 Surrendered 0
1Paint1 Aged Over 20  1 Geldings
1Grade/Mixed Breed/Unknown1 Aged Over 20  1 Mares
0 Seized 0
3 Abandoned 0
3Draft1 Aged 10-14  1 Mares1 Aged 15-20  1 Mares1 Aged Over 20  1 Mares
0 Returned 0
0 Transferred 0
0 Born at facility 0


1 Re-homing Detail Horses adopted/sold by breed, age & gender during 2019:  
1Paint1 Aged Over 20  1 Geldings





Definitions:
Donated: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by its owner/trainer/responsible agent utilizing a donation document.
Free Lease: The ownership of the equine is maintained by the owner/trainer/responsible agent; the custody and responsibility for the shelter and care of the equine is transferred to the organization utilizing a free lease document.
Purchased from Owner: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by its owner/trainer/responsible agent utilizing a purchase document.
Purchased from Auction: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by purchasing the equine at an auction.
Purchased from Kill Pen: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by purchasing the equine from a kill pen.
Surrendered (Hardship): The ownership and custody of the equine is relinquished to the organization by its owner/trainer/responsible agent with or without the use of an intake document.
Seized: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization as a result of the equine being seized by law enforcement or another agency and removed from the owner.
Abandoned: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization as a result of the equine being abandoned by the owner or the owner was unable to be located.
Returned: The equine was previously a part of the organization, was adopted, and ownership and custody of the equine has been transferred back to the organization.
Transferred: The custody of the equine is transferred within an organization or from one organization to another non-profit or foster organization to provide retirement, retraining, rehabilitation and/or adoption services with no change in ownership.
Born: The equine was born at the facility.

Foal: An equine up to one year old; a colt is a male foal and a filly is a female foal.
Mare: A female equine.
Stallion: A male equine that has not been castrated.
Gelding: A castrated male equine.

Equine Assisted Services (EAS): Any activity that incorporates equine interactions and/or the equine environment, mounted or unmounted, to include 1) psychotherapy and/or mental health counseling aimed at achieving goals set forth by the licensed mental health professional and the client, 2) occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology treatment strategies utilizing equine movement set forth by the licensed therapist and the client, 3) horsemanship instruction adapted to the ability/disability of those receiving services, for the purpose of contributing positively to their cognitive, physical, emotional and social well-being conducted by a certified professional, and 4) experiential learning approaches that promote the development of life skills to achieve educational, professional and personal goals conducted by a licensed educator, mental health professional or coach. Please refer to our Guidelines for Conducting EAS for additional information.

Special Needs: Any difficulty or difficulties (such as a physical, emotional, behavioral, or cognitive disability or impairment) that require or benefit from instructors, specialists, counselors, trainers and/or facilitators who have certified training for their scope of practice applicable to the people participating in the programs and specific to the program offerings. The difficulty may not be limited to a health issue but may result from the interaction between the individual and the society in which he or she lives arising from an abusive or unhealthy environment or situation and/or a lack of resources, including economic resources, placing them at risk of a future with less than optimal outcomes.

At-Risk: Refers to being at-risk of a future with less than optimal outcomes. Youth are considered at-risk for a number of reasons, such as if they are homeless or transient, involved in drugs or alcohol, abused sexually, physically or emotionally, mentally ill, neglected at home or live in stressful family environments, lacking social or emotional supports, and involved with delinquent peers. At-Risk youth are likely to be involved in a number of risky behaviors, such as running away, skipping school, drinking underage, engaging in sexual behavior, displaying disruptive behavior, bullying/harassment, fighting, and committing acts of vandalism.

Community Outreach: Refers to public education programs aimed at educating the public about the horse-human bond, issues impacting the welfare of horses, and how horses change lives and activities that include, but are not limited to, any activity OTHER THAN Equine Assisted Services (EAS) that require a credentialed service provider, such as off site visits with horses at hospitals, nursing homes, and schools, crisis response, workplace well-being, on site tours, seminars and clinics, camps, community service hours, able-bodied mounted and unmounted lessons, etc.

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