Idaho Horse Rescue Inc.
EQUINE WELFARE NETWORK PROFILE



Idaho Horse Rescue Inc.
890 E Franklin Rd. Ste 202
Meridian, ID 83642
Phone: 208-938-2358

EIN: 27-1894757
Founded: 2010
Profile Last Updated June 02, 2021

Public Charity


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Equine Welfare Network Guardian
AWARDED ANNUALLY
Effective Date
May 2020

We are proud to be a 2020 EQUUS Foundation Guardian and share our horse care & use practices with the public.

We welcome you to donate directly to us. We will receive 100% of your donation made here.

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Guardians
are organizations on the Equine Welfare Network that demonstrate a commitment to public transparency and accountability by their willingness to publish and share extensive data about their operations.
Awarded Annually
Effective Date: May 2020
Last Updated: July 27, 2020

MISSION & PROGRAMS

Mission:
Idaho Horse Rescue's mission is to rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome abused, neglected and abandoned horses. In addition to facilitating their rescue, IHR's mission is to physically and mentally rehabilitate the horses in our care and to coordinate adoptions into permanent homes; to educate our community in order to reduce unnecessary animal suffering and to advocate for harsher penalties to violators of animal protection laws.

Our organization provides programs involved with equine rescue, adoption & retirement
Our organization does not provide community outreach and/or public education programs involving horses.
Our organization is directly responsible for the care and shelter of equines involved in our programs.
100% of our total programs and services are horse-related.
Our organization does not use foster, overflow and/or satellite facilities
Number of facilities/locations where horses used in our programs are HOUSED AND CARED FOR or were HOUSED AND CARED FOR during 2020: 1
     1. Idaho Horse Rescue (Main)

Horse Rescue, Rehabilitation, Retraining & Re-homing:
Overview of our programs involved with rescue, rehabilitation, retraining, re-homing and/or retirement:
     Idaho Horse Rescue is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, and rehoming of abused, abandoned and neglected horses. We work with local authorities and our community to identify and report cases of neglect and abuse and we help facilitate their seizures when necessary.
     Once horses are in our care, we provide rehabilitative care, including all needed emergency and ongoing veterinary care, training, food, shelter and love. Horses that are not adoptable, either due to health, age or lack of opportunities, are given life-long sanctuary at our rescue.
     After rehabilitating horses, we actively try to find them adoptive homes through outreach on social media, equine websites and our newsletter. We have strict adoption policies that ensure that adopted horses have enough space, food and at least one other equine companion. Our adoption contract guarantees our right to check on our horses for one year post adoption to ensure their wellbeing.
     Placing our rescued horses in loving and educated forever homes allows us to then rescue more horses.
     We also seek to educate the public about responsible horse ownership, and the plight of unwanted horses through our newsletter, social media accounts, and community involvement.
     In January 2017, during one of the most severe winters in Idaho history, IHR took on our most intricate rescue to date. JD & Ryat had survived an abusive owner only to be abandoned to the Boulder Mountain wilderness to survive on their own for over 2 years. Of the dozens of original herd members; only 3 were left. We were, unfortunately, unable to locate a 3rd horse which was believed to have succumbed to the elements & wolves. While JD’s rescue was not as involved, Ryat’s required the aid of a helicopter, and was covered by local news outlets.
     During the last 10 years we have provided rescue and refuge to over 150 horses. We have been able to fulfill our mission because of the immense dedication of our director, the generosity of local supporters as well as local and national grant opportunities. In order to sustain our organization, we actively seek out funding opportunities and seek to establish excellent relationships with individual and corporate donors.


GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT & FINANCIAL REPORTING

Staff & Volunteers:
Chief Staff Officer (CSO):  Robert Bruno
Employees/Independent Contractors:   Full-Time:  1  Part-Time:  2  Volunteers:  4
Staff Recruitment, Screening and Training processes including employees and independent contractors:
    Prospective staff/independent contractors complete a written application
    Prospective staff/independent contractors must provide in writing if they have ever been convicted of a felony, convicted of a sexual offense, or convicted for animal cruelty or neglect
    Staff and/or contractors are evaluated on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in their job description
    Staff and/or contractors are updated on all the organization's policies and procedures on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in policy or procedure
Not Checked:
    Staff and/or contractors are required to complete a Liability Release/Hold Harmless Agreement
    Staff and/or contractors are required to provide Emergency Medical Information
    Staff and/or contractors are required to sign a Photo Release
    Staff and/or contractors are required to undergo a Background Check
    Staff and/or contractors provide parent/guardian information if applicable
    Staff and/or contractors are carry current health insurance
    Staff and/or contractors have a written job description
    Staff and/or contractors receive training that includes safety guidelines, confidentiality, horse handling, horse identification, and emergency procedures; additional training is job specific
    Staff and/or contractors have a supervisor and is responsible for keeping their supervisor up to date on work related activities
    The organization provides a handbook to every member of the staff, including employees and/or independent contractors serving in staff positions;
    The handbook includes information, such as hours of work, vacation, sick leave, dress code, cell phone usage, and the protocol for dismissal
    The handbook is reviewed annually and updated
    One or more staff members or contractors are trained in CPR and human first aid
    One or more staff members or contractors are trained in equine first aid
    Staff and/or contractors are subject to Random Drug Screening

Volunteer Recruitment, Screening and Training processes:
    Prospective volunteers complete a written application
    Prospective volunteers must provide in writing if they have ever been convicted of a felony, convicted of a sexual offense, or convicted for animal cruelty or neglect
    Every volunteer is required to complete a Liability Release/Hold Harmless Agreement
    Every volunteer is required to provide Emergency Medical Information
    Every volunteer provides parent/guardian information if applicable
    Every volunteer has a written job description
    Every volunteer is updated on all the organization's policies and procedures on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in policy or procedure
    Every volunteer is assigned a supervisor (staff member and/or senior volunteer) and is responsible for keeping their supervisor up to date on work related activities
    The supervisor assesses the volunteer's abilities and assigns specific duties to the volunteer based on their skills
    The organization records and maintains written attendance information and hours on every volunteer
    The organization holds regular orientation sessions for volunteers and prospective volunteers that includes an overview of the organization, its mission, activities, volunteer responsibilities and expectations, safety guidelines, and a tour of the facility
Not Checked:
    Every volunteer is required to sign a Photo Release
    Every volunteer is required to undergo a Background Check
    Every volunteer carries current health insurance
    Every volunteer is evaluated on an annual and as needed basis or with any change in their job description
    Every volunteer receives training that includes safety guidelines, confidentiality, horse handling, horse identification, and emergency procedures; additional training is job specific
    The organization provides a Volunteer Handbook to every volunteer
    The Volunteer Handbook includes volunteer-related information, such as hours of work, dress code, cell phone usage, and the protocol for dismissal
    The Volunteer Handbook is reviewed annually and updated
    Every volunteer is subject to Random Drug Screening

Governing Body:
Board meetings per year:  1
Number of Board Members:  3  Number of Voting Board Members:  3

Board Compensation:
Is Board Chair compensated?  No  Is Treasurer compensated?  No
Are there any other Voting Board Members that are compensated?  No

Board/Staff Relationships:
Are any members of the Board or Staff related to each other through family or business relationships? Yes
If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member.
The President of the Board is the Founder/Director of Idaho Horse Rescue.
     The Secretary is a banker at the bank we use.
     The Treasurer is a vet and is compensated for veterinarian services.

Board Affiliations:
Are any Board members or Staff associated with and/or compensated by another organization with a relationship or business affiliation to your organization? Yes
If yes, provide the name, title, responsibility and family/business relationship of each Board and/or Staff member, and the name of the related organization.
The Founder/Director owns the facility where programs are conducted.

Conflict of Interest:
Does your organization have a written conflict of interest policy and regularly and consistently monitor and enforce compliance with the policy, including requiring officers, directors or trustees, and key employees to disclose annually interests that could give rise to conflicts?  No


Organization documents available on our website:
    None

Organization documents available on request:
    Most recent Financials
    Most recent IRS Form 990
    Equine Intake Guidelines
    Adoption/Foster Agreement
    Volunteer Handbook
    Staff Handbook
    Bylaws


POLICIES

Acquisition
Our organization acquires horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Return  
    Surrender  
    Seizure  
    Abandonment  

Our organization does not acquire horses/equines from the following source(s):
    Donation  
    Lease  
    Purchase/Adoption from Owner  
    Auction  
    Kill pen/Feedlot  

Our organization will accept the following:
    Geldings
    Mares
    Pregnant Mares
    Foals
    Stallions
    Only Stallions to be castrated
Intake, Assessment & Training
Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization requires the following with respect to the health status of the horse:
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, our veterinarian will administer appropriate vaccinations
Not Checked:
    A current Coggins
    Vaccination records that have been administered within the last 12 months
    If health records are not available or are out-of-date, the owner is responsible for having vaccinations administered.

Prior to a horse being accepted and/or arriving at the facility, the organization has the following policies in place:
    The horse is evaluated at its place of residence
Not Checked:
    The owner of a potential horse is interviewed over the phone or in person prior to seeing the horse
    The owner completes an application/contract which constitutes the agreement between the owner and our organization
    The owner is financially responsible for the shipping of the horse to and from the organization
    Horses are not taken on trial
    Horses are on trial for up to 30 days
    Horses are on trial up to 60 days
    Horses are on trial for 60 or more days
    The trial period may be reduced based on the horse's progress
    During the trial period, the organization accepts total financial responsibility for the care of the horse, including board, feed, shoeing and any necessary veterinary care
    During the trial period, the organization accepts financial responsibility for the care of the horse, including board, feed, shoeing and any necessary veterinary care, up to a fixed amount agreed upon by the organization and the owner
    During the trial period, the owner/donor is financially responsible for the care of the horse, including board, feed, shoeing and any necessary veterinary care
    The trial period may be terminated by either the organization or the owner for any reason

Upon intake, the organization has the following quarantine policy in place:
    The horse is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine at the facility for a prescribed period of time
Not Checked:
    The horse is confined to a designated and separate area for isolation and quarantine off-site for a prescribed period of time
    The horse is not quarantined

The typical length of quarantine is:   20 to 30 days

Following arrival of the equine at the facility, the following is performed:
    Physical examination by a veterinarian
    Physical examination by trained barn staff
    Photographs are taken
    A Henneke Body Conditioning Score is assigned
    Physical examination by a farrier
    Physical examination by a dentist
    Vaccinations
    De-worming
Not Checked:
    Coggins test
    Blood work other than Coggins
    Fecal test
    The horse is scanned to check for a microchip
    The horse is microchipped if the scan indicates that there is no microchip

Horses are assessed for following skills and behaviors:
    Retrieval from a pasture/paddock
    Leading with a halter and lead rope
    Temperament, disposition and attitude, such as rated from very calm to very high spirited
    Loading onto and unloading off a trailer
    Tolerance to unusual objects and loud noises
    Clipping
Not Checked:
    Saddling
    Bridling
    Lunging
    Mounting and dismounting
    Riding at the walk
    Riding at the trot
    Riding at the canter
    Riding by a beginner and/or unbalanced rider
    Jumping
    Driving (Pulling a carriage)
    Known vices, i.e., cribbing, biting, kicking, weaving, stall walking, etc
    Grooming
    Bathing
    Tolerance to multiple handlers at the same time

Horses provided formal training (groundwork or riding):   As needed; no set schedule

Additional information about our intake, assessment & training policies and practices:
We are a small organization that focuses on rescuing neglected and abused horses. We often take in horses that are seized by county officials and that are in bad shape. Our goal is to rehabilitate and heal them, both physically and emotionally.


Breeding
The organization has the following policies related to breeding and stallions:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, does NOT breed horses.
Not Checked:
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, breeds horses
    The facility or facilities where our organization conducts its programs, including foster facilities, are permitted to house stallions
    Our organization prohibits the breeding of horses/equines when re-homed or this statement is not applicable as all horses/equines remain at our organization for their lifetimes and are not re-homed under any circumstances.

Euthanasia
The organization has the following policies related to euthanasia:
    Our organization will never have a horse euthanized for space
    Our organization may have a healthy horse euthanized if it is a threat to itself, other horses, or people
    Our organization may have a horse euthanized after all reasonable treatment options have been explored
    Euthanasia is done on site when possible to decrease trauma from transport
    Disposal of the carcass is handled within 24 hours
Not Checked:
    Our organization will never have a healthy horse euthanized under any circumstances
    Euthanasia is done at the veterinarian's facility

The following are authorized to administer the procedure for your organization in accordance with state laws:
    Veterinarian
    Senior staff with appropriate training
Not Checked:
    A certified euthanasia technician
    Employee of animal control shelter or humane society with appropriate training
    Veterinary student under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian
    Not applicable. Our organization prohibits euthanasia under any circumstances

Rehoming
Our organization has the following re-homing (adoption/purchase) policies and procedures in place:
    All potential adopters/purchasers complete a contract which constitutes the agreement between our organization and the new owner
    Our organization will only re-home a horse to a location where another horse resides
    Potential adopters/purchasers must visit our organization and be observed with the horse on site
    The distance of a potential adopter/purchaser's home from our facility is a consideration for when re-homing a horse
    Our organization conducts a site visit of the adopter/purchaser's facility before the transfer of the horse to the adopter/purchaser's facility
    Adopters/purchasers are NOT required to provide updates
Not Checked:
    Our organization does NOT re-home a horse to first time horse owners
    Potential adopters/purchasers are encouraged to do a short-term, on-site foster with the horse
    Our organization does not re-home horses under any circumstances; our organization retains custody of our horses and ensures care of the horses for their lifetimes.

The uploaded Re-homing agreement includes the following re-homing (adoption/purchase) statements:
    Our agreement states that if there is any breach of contract the horse must be returned to our organization
Not Checked:
    Our agreement states that re-homed horses CANNOT be sold, auctioned, or given away under any circumstances
    Our agreement states that re-homed horses CANNOT be sold, auctioned, or given away without prior written approval of our organization
    Our agreement states that re-homed horses cannot be bred
    Our agreement states that our organization reserves the right to make unannounced visits
    Our agreement states that our organization reserves the right to make scheduled visits
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers can return a horse to our organization free of charge
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers can return a horse to our organization for a fee
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for one year
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for two years
    Our agreement states that adopters/purchasers are required to provide updates (photos, vet records) for three or more years
    None of the statements are included.

Our organization requires references from the following:
    Personal/Other
Not Checked:
    Veterinarian
    Farrier
    Not applicable or no references required.

Transfer of ownership occurs:   Immediately (at the time of adoption/purchase)

The average equine re-homing (adoption/purchase) fee received by your organization:
$501 to $750

Our organization has the following policies and procedures related to horses that need to be retired, are no longer useful, or are no longer manageable:
    Horses remain at our organization for their lifetimes
Not Checked:
    Horses may be found suitable homes by our organization
    Horses may be returned to their owners
    Horses may be sent to auction
    In the case a horse is unmanageable and demonstrates repeated dangerous behaviors, the horse may be euthanized
    In the case a horse is unsound and/or unhealthy and cannot be treated to relieve suffering, the horse may be euthanized
    If a suitable home cannot be located within 12 months, the horse may be euthanized


Additional information about our rehoming policies and practices:
Our agreement states:
     Adopter will be allowed to retain the equine and all right, title and interest and control of the equine will be released to Adopter after the end of this one-year period.
     During this one-year period, Adopter may not sell, give away, lend, lease, sell for slaughter, or remove from Adopters personal supervision and control or move the equine from the address described herein, except for emergencies, shows, trail rides and other situations, without the written approval of the Idaho Horse Rescue, Inc. If Adopter does not notify Idaho Horse Rescue, Inc. of change of residence, phone number, mailing address, or location of horse within (thirty) 30 days by phone and mail, Idaho Horse Rescue, Inc. can terminate the Adoption Agreement at any time.
View Re-homing Agreement

EQUINE CARE & SHELTER/FACILITY INFORMATION

Total facilities at which our organization cares for and shelters horses used in our programs: 1

Our organization has the following policies and procedures in place pertaining to foster, overflow and/or satellite facilities:
Our organization does not use foster, overflow and/or satellite facilities






Definitions:
Donation: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by its owner/trainer/responsible agent utilizing a donation document.
Lease: The ownership of the equine is maintained by the owner/trainer/responsible agent; the custody and responsibility for the shelter and care of the equine is transferred to the organization utilizing a lease document.
Owner Purchase: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by its owner/trainer/responsible agent utilizing a purchase or adoption document.
Auction: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by acquiring the equine at an auction.
Kill Pen: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by acquiring the equine from a kill pen.
Surrender (Hardship): The ownership and custody of the equine is relinquished to the organization by its owner/trainer/responsible agent with or without the use of an intake document.
Seizure: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization as a result of the equine being seized by law enforcement or another agency and removed from the owner.
Abandonment: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization as a result of the equine being abandoned by the owner or the owner was unable to be located.
Return: The equine was previously a part of the organization, was adopted, and ownership and custody of the equine has been transferred back to the organization.
Transfer: The custody of the equine is transferred within an organization or from one organization to another non-profit or foster organization to provide retirement, retraining, rehabilitation and/or adoption services with no change in ownership.
Born: The equine was born at the facility.
Adoption: The ownership and custody of the equine is transferred to the organization by an organization specializing in the re-homing of equines in transition utilizing a purchase or adoption document.

Foal: An equine up to one year old; a colt is a male foal and a filly is a female foal.
Mare: A female equine.
Stallion: A male equine that has not been castrated.
Gelding: A castrated male equine.

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